Clinicians Need to Know ICD-10 to Adequately Document Care

Pete Rigby

Pete Rigby

As the October 1, 2015 switch from ICD-9 to ICD-10 to communicate diagnoses looms, we fear that some clinicians think that only their billing staff need to know about the changes. Hawaii Chapter (HAPTA) Practice Chair and Federal Affairs Liaison Herb Yee calls this the “boogey man under the bed” and urges members who don’t know the details about ICD-10 to wake up and learn them ASAP. HAPTA will offer a webinar presented by coding and billing expert Rick Gawenda, PT, on this topic on Thursday, Aug. 27 titled, “The ABC’s of ICD-10 for Physical Therapy.” Washington Chapter members and their staff may also attend the webinar. Besides the HAPTA course, you may also find a webinar recording on the APTA website, along with other resources.

Clinicians who do not understand all of the added information contained in this new coding will inadequately document. Inadequate or inaccurate documentation will lead to non-payment or money being taken back. Whether the PT is initiating the coding or documenting care delivered as a result of an MD referral, documentation must be adequate, accurate and consistent with other clinician’s documentation related to a particular episode of care. For instance, if an MD’s ICD 10 is more general than the condition the PT ends up treating, that can lead to reimbursement problems.

Don’t let the ICD-10 boogey man get you.

Pete Rigby

PTWA Reimbursement Committee Chair

Advertisements